Weirdest Tales of Elvis Presley Being Found Alive

Weirdest Tales of Elvis Presley Being Found Alive

Official records tell us, the “King of Rock and Roll” passed away 41 years ago. If he somehow survived, could he still be alive? The answer is yes. He would be eighty-three years old. These are the weirdest tales of Elvis Presley being found alive.

It did not take long, for his most ardent fans, to suspect that Elvis, might still be alive. Two hours after the annnouncement of his demise in 1977, a man appeared at the airport in Memphis, where he purchased a one-way ticket to Buenos Aires. Using the name “John Burrows”, the stranger paid in cash, and was last seen boarding the plane for Argentina. The man was said to resemble Presley, and the name “John Burrows” was an alias which Presley had often used for checking into hotels.

At the Elvis museum in Missouri, the curator makes no apology for the poor quality of the wax replica of the King, that rests in a copy of his casket. He said, it may not look like Elvis, but neither did the guy in the original casket. The king was laid to rest in Forest Hill Cemetery, where on his headstone, his middle name is spelled wrong, two A’s in Aaron, where there should be only one. According to conspiracy theorists, because Presley is still alive, the fake name was used intentionally.

Documents on Elvis Presley, have been released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He took a tour of the FBI’s headquarters in 1971, where he offered to the bureau his “services, in any way,” according to an FBI memo. The author Gail Brewer-Giorgio claims to have pored over tons of these documents, and she came to the conclusion that the bureau recruited Presley as an undercover agent in 1976. Elvis had an airplane to sell. This brought him into contact with organized crime. He infiltrated the criminal organization at the very top, but they discovered he was working as a mole for the feds. He had to disappear. He was put into the witness protection program, and he was assisted by the FBI, in faking his funeral.

The 1990 comedy film, Home Alone, worked wonders for the career of Macaulay Culkin. But is this is also the 33rd film in which Elvis Presley appears? During the airport scene, in which the Catherine O’Hara character, fails to book a plane ticket, a non-speaking extra hovers behind her. A lot of people think this is Presley. Even with a beard, he kinda looks like the King.

Some people suspect that Presley is alive and well, and still singing, as Pastor Bob Joyce, of Benton, Arkansas. Bob is now 83, the same age Presley would have been. Many of those who have seen and heard pastor Bob on YouTube, are convinced that he is Elvis, and that he is hiding in plain sight. According to an analyst who has compared photographs of the pastor, with those of the King of Rock and Roll, their teeth and their ears are a match, and the pastor occasionally wears a diamond ring, resembling one of Elvis’. Although Bob denies he is the King, he would have to say that, to maintain his cover, would he not?

In 2015 in San Diego, California, the police were trying to confirm the identity, of a white-haired homeless man, who went by the name of Jessie. Investigators used DNA testing, hoping to match a known profile in the national database. Laboratory workers were stunned when the results for “Jessie Doe”, came back as a ninety-seven percent match, to Elvis Aaron Presley. Jessie himself, never released a statement of denial, of this accusation.

Paddy Power is an Irish bookmaker conducting business through a chain of licensed betting parlors, in the United Kingdom. They offer odds on all major sporting events. In 2017, they offered a return of two thousand to one, to those bettors willing to wager that the King would be found alive, before the end of the year. No punter collected on this bet.

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